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$50 REGISTRATION FEE (Includes a 1-Year Membership with LDANB, 2 Nutrition Breaks, a 3-Course Meal, and Parking)

Alternatively, print and complete the symposium registration form, and send it along with payment to our office at

Learning Disabilities Association of New Brunswick

Suite 203-403 Regent Street
Fredericton, NB E3B 3X6

P: (506) 459-7852
TF: 1-877-544-7852
F: (506) 455-9300
E: admin@ldanb-taanb.ca

10:30-11:30: Focus groups 1-6 / Forum de discussion 1-6

 

FACILITATOR / FACILITATRICE: Elizabeth J. Hall, Ph.D., L.Psych.

Two questions from the GNB Employment Action Plan for Persons with a Disability will be considered:

  1. The need to establish a consultation process to develop clear guidelines for requirement of a psycho-educational assessment.
  2. The need to establish consistent guidelines for providing complete documentation required for students to apply for entrance into post-secondary institutions.

Elizabeth Hall is a graduate of Memorial University of Newfoundland and holds graduate degrees in psychology from the University of Windsor, Ontario. She has been practicing as a licensed clinical psychologist for over ten years. Seven years of providing private practice services in adult assessment and psychotherapy in New Brunswick are complemented by five years of working with adults in the Counseling Centre at the University of Windsor. She is currently serving as a board member for the Learning Disabilities Association of New Brunswick.

This session will be delivered in English.
FACILITATOR / FACILITATRICE: Lori Leach, PhD. Strategic Initiatives Consultant, Apprenticeship Branch, PETL

Two apprenticeship case studies will be reviewed and discussed by a panel of experts in the field: a PETL Training and Education Support Services Consultant, an Apprenticeship Learning Strategist, an Assistive Technology Specialist, and a Licensed Psychologist.  Discussion will focus around how decisions are made to support an apprentice with exam accommodations and learning interventions.  Questions are raised concerning how such supports may affect the apprentice’s long term success and employability, public safety, costs to government, and perceived quality of the apprenticeship program.

This session will be delivered in English. However, the facilitator is bilingual and will be happy to answer any questions in French following the presentation.

FACILITATOR / FACILITATRICE: Kim Korotkov (EECD)

Universal design for learning (UDL) is a framework for planning that enables all students to gain knowledge, skills, and enthusiasm for learning. Formative Assessment provides the information needed to adjust teaching and learning while they are happening. When used together, Formative Assessment and UDL can help teachers utilize best practices to engage students and ultimately increase student achievement. This session will focus on two questions to facilitate discussion around the knowledge and strategies needed to implement both in inclusive classrooms:

  1. What are the benefits of approaching formative assessment from the UDL framework?
  2. What are the challenges of approaching assessment from the UDL framework?

Kim Korotkov is a learning specialist for Education Support Services at the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development. She has over 15 years of experience as a classroom and resource teacher at the middle and high school level. She also taught for 7 years at the University of Guelph as a psychology instructor in learning disabilities. She recently began her PhD in the area of high schools and inclusive education.

This session will be delivered in English.

FACILITATOR / FACILITATRICE: Jeanne Duquette (EDPE)

Cet atelier permettra de répondre à des questions en lien avec les deux points suivants:

  • Les types d’accommodations qui sont offertes aux élèves ayant un trouble d’apprentissage;
  • Comment l’enseignant détermine les accommodations appropriées pour ses élèves.

Jeanne Duquette a œuvré comme enseignante-ressource dans diverses écoles du nord et du sud de la province, au primaire et au secondaire, avant de devenir agente pédagogique responsable de divers dossiers reliés à l’enseignement ressource, au ministère de l’Éducation et du Développement de la petite enfance. Elle a obtenu un baccalauréat en orthopédagogie de l’Université de Montréal en 1987 et a étudié à la maitrise, en adaptation scolaire, à l’Université de Victoria, en 2003-2004.

This session will be delivered in French. However, the facilitator is bilingual and will be happy to answer any questions in English following the presentation.
FACILITATOR / FACILITATRICE: Anne Comfort (MTA)

Three questions to consider at this session:

  1. How is the transition to post-secondary currently taking place?
  2. In an ideal world, what should it look like?
  3. What part do I currently play in the transition to post secondary?
  4. Who are the important players? What role do they/should they play?

Anne Comfort, M.Ed., is the Coordinator of the Meighen Centre for Learning Disabilities at Mount Allison University in Sackville, New Brunswick. She has worked in the field of Adult Learning Disabilities for the past 9 years. Formerly a high school and adult educator, Anne has taught and lived in Manitoba, Northwest Territories, Nunavut and New Brunswick. She is currently the Chair of Mt.A.’s Senate Committee on Students with Disabilities as well as the Atlantic Region Representative for the Canadian Association of Disability Service Providers in Post-secondary Education. Her areas of interest include assistive technology and transitioning from high school to post secondary.

This session will be delivered in English. However, the facilitator is bilingual and will be happy to answer any questions in French following the presentation.
FACILITATOR / FACILITATRICE: Kelly Vanbuskirk LL.B.

This session will be delivered in English.

 

1h30-2h30: Sessions 7-12

 

SPEAKER / CONFÉRENCIER: David Banfield (LDANL)

This session is designed for individuals who would like an introduction to the nature and characteristics of learning disabilities and how it affects those with the disability. It aims to give basic facts about what a learning disability is and more importantly what it isn’t. Attendees will leave the session with a understanding of not only the characteristics of learning disabilities but also some insight on what it is like to have a learning disability. This session will be particularly useful for parents, educators and individuals who would like to broaden their understanding of the basic nature and characteristics of learning disabilities.

David has spent the past 13 years working in Education and Community based programs in St. John’s, Newfoundland and outside the country. Currently, David is the Executive Director of the Learning Disabilities Association of Newfoundland and Labrador after spending 7 years as a teacher for at risk youth and students with learning disabilities.
David is also involved in several community projects including the Vibrant Communities Literacy Program, Waypoints Youth Are Working Program as a well as the Coalition for Educational Opportunities.

This session will be delivered in English.

SPEAKERS / CONFÉRENCIÈRES: Wendy Johnston

This session ….

Wendy ….

This session will be delivered in English. However, one of the facilitators is bilingual and will be happy to answer any questions in French following the presentation.
SPEAKER / CONFÉRENCIÈRE: Jeanne Duquette (EDPE)

La différenciation en salle de classe est une action pédagogique connue depuis plusieurs années maintenant. Le design universel pour l’apprentissage (aussi connu sous le nom de pédagogie universelle) est un concept plus nouveau dans la francophonie et vient compléter la différenciation afin de répondre encore mieux aux besoins de tous. Le DUA déborde de la salle de classe et devient aussi la responsabilité des intervenants à tous les paliers du système scolaire. Cet atelier a pour but d’expliquer le design universel pour l’apprentissage et ses liens avec les élèves ayant un trouble d’apprentissage.

Jeanne Duquette a œuvré comme enseignante-ressource dans diverses écoles du nord et du sud de la province, au primaire et au secondaire, avant de devenir agente pédagogique responsable de divers dossiers reliés à l’enseignement ressource, au ministère de l’Éducation et du Développement de la petite enfance. Elle a obtenu un baccalauréat en orthopédagogie de l’Université de Montréal en 1987 et a étudié à la maitrise, en adaptation scolaire, à l’Université de Victoria, en 2003-2004.

SPEAKERS / CONFÉRENCIERS: Dr. Patricia Peterson (UNB) & Dr. Bill Morrisson (UNB)

Programs and services within school settings have often had a singular focus on addressing the identification of risk-need factors and the delivery of timely intervention and support services. Traditionally, such approaches have emphasized the problems or challenges associated with existing or emerging learning disabilities or concerns in children and youth, and the approaches or interventions needed to remediate or address areas of risk and need. Recent better practice research in educational and psychological domains asserts the importance of moving beyond a problem-focused approach to embrace a more positive view of the capacity of children and youth to learn and to thrive. This shift involves the recognition that an individual’s state of well-being is not only influenced by problems and risk-need concerns, but also is impacted by the existence of positive factors present within individuals and their social settings that contribute to learning, and to positive growth and development.

The role of the school has been regarded as an important environment for promoting the wellness and resilience of children and youth with learning disabilities. Schools provide a critical context for shaping children’s self-esteem, self-efficacy and sense of control over their lives.The educational context provides key opportunities for delivering activities and comprehensive initiatives related to positive mental health. Positive mental health approaches have been positively correlated with an increased understanding of learning needs, styles and preferences. Such approaches also provide:

  • Enhanced opportunities for children and youth to demonstrate age-appropriate autonomy and choice
  • Heightened sensitivity to the needs of others and demonstration of pro-social behaviors
  • Reduction in high-risk behaviors
  • Enhanced academic achievement and school attendance
  • Decreased oppositional behaviour
  • Increased academic confidence and engagement

This presentation will provide participants with an opportunity to explore evidence-based practices in promoting positive mental health among children and youth with learning disabilities. Participants will also be introduced to the Positive Mental Health Toolkit,an electronic resource that provides families and educators with tools to assist with the implementation of PMH approaches with the school context.

Dr. Patricia Peterson holds a doctoral degree in Educational Psychology from Boston University. Along with serving as a faculty member at the University of New Brunswick, she is Co-Executive Director of the university’s Health and Education Research Group, serving as Principal Investigator on several initiatives related to educational program evaluation, student wellness, Mental Fitness, and knowledge exchange processes. In addition, Dr. Peterson is a consultant on numerous Provincial initiatives, including those related to integrated service delivery for children and youth with complex needs, First Nation community mobilization, and positive psychology approaches in comprehensive school health contexts. Dr. Peterson’s areas of expertise include educational exceptionalities, learning disabilities and accommodations, inclusive education systems, and assessment and interventions for at-risk children and youth. Recently, Dr. Peterson has co-authored a book outlining comprehensive positive mental health perspectives, practices and policies for creating cultures of wellness in schools.

Dr. Morrison has advanced graduate degrees in both educational foundations and psychology, and is a fully bilingual clinical psychologist. In addition to his licenses as a professional educator and psychologist and his 20 years of clinical practice, Dr. Morrison has been instrumental in the design and implementation of New Brunswick’s Interdepartmental Integrated Service Delivery program for children and youth with mental health and addiction concerns. In addition, he has been retained as a Senior Consultant for the NB Department of Healthy and Inclusive Communities since 2006, and was the initial author of their provincial wellness strategy framework. In addition to his clinical work, Dr.Morrison serves as a Professor of Educational Psychology at the University of New Brunswick, and established a university research centre on applied health and education in 2006. Dr. Morrison’s most recent publication on positive mental health and strength-based approaches is being used as a key resource document by the Pan-Canadian Joint Consortium for School Health to engage and mobilize educational institutions and communities in creating readiness for positive change.

SPEAKER / CONFÉRENCIÈRE: Gisèle Desjardins (UM)

Cet atelier expliquera ce qu’on entend par stratégies d’apprentissage métacognitives et cognitives. Il identifiera aussi les conditions nécessaires pour mettre en place ces stratégies qui permettent de maximiser son potentiel.

Gisèle Desjardins a étudié en langues et en éducation spécialisée à l’Université d’Ottawa et à l’Université de Moncton. Elle a enseigné au secondaire, au CCNB et à l’université. Elle a travaillé plusieurs années à titre d’enseignante spécialiste pour les élèves ayant un trouble de l’audition et comme enseignante ressource auprès d’élèves ayant un trouble d’apprentissage. Elle a aussi été agente pédagogique au District 1. Depuis janvier 2013, elle occupe le poste de Conseillère en stratégies d’apprentissage pour les étudiants ayant un trouble d’apprentissage à l’Université de Moncton.

This session will be delivered in French. However, the facilitator is bilingual and will be happy to answer any questions in English following the presentation.
SPEAKER / CONFÉRENCIÈRE: Elizabeth J. Hall, Ph D., L.Psych.

An overview of the assessment and diagnosis of learning disabilities will be provided. Common challenges encountered in this process and the rationale for some of the academic accommodations that arise from it will be discussed.

Elizabeth Hall is a graduate of Memorial University of Newfoundland and holds graduate degrees in psychology from the University of Windsor, Ontario. She has been practicing as a licensed clinical psychologist for over ten years. Seven years of providing private practice services in adult assessment and psychotherapy in New Brunswick are complemented by five years of working with adults in the Counseling Centre at the University of Windsor. She is currently serving as a board member for the Learning Disabilities Association of New Brunswick.

This session will be delivered in English.

 

2:45–3:45—Sessions 13-18

 

SPEAKER / CONFÉRENCIER: Andrew Daley (UNB)

An environmental scan of the Assistive Technology landscape in the post-secondary system, and how it can benefit those who have learning disabilities achieve successful academic outcomes. From software and hardware to the iPad and beyond.

Andrew Daley holds a Bachelor of Arts in Economics from the University of New Brunswick. He is a Certified Assistive Technologist and Learning Strategist providing training and support for assistive technology and strategies that extend to students with disabilities at the University of New Brunswick since 1999, and the New Brunswick Community College system since 2007. He is Chair for the Canadian National Institute for the Blinds NB Board of Directors and sits on the Government Relations and Advocacy Committees in NB, nationally on the CNIB Programs and Services Committee and the CNIB Youth Council, CNIB National Council of Chairs. Most recently, appointed to the Premiers Council on the Status of the Disabled Persons. He is also the 2012 recipient of the CNIB Holly Award for volunteerism and the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal for distinguished volunteer service to community and country.

This session will be delivered in English.

SPEAKER / CONFÉRENCIÈRE: Claudette Larocque

Youth with learning disabilities face considerable barriers to entry and challenges in completing post-secondary education, as well as in finding and keeping appropriate employment. However, research has shown that youth with learning disabilities are able to succeed provided that they are assessed and supported appropriately. This study, conducted by LDAC in 2011, set out to conduct an inventory of Canadian supports and programs available to students with learning disabilities for transition from high school to work or post-secondary education. It provided foundational information on the barriers and facilitators to successful transition as well as the gaps in supports for these youth.

Claudette has a background in social work and has worked in the disability field for the past 26 years, twenty one of them with the Learning Disabilities Association of Canada.

As Executive Director, Claudette leads and implements LDAC Board policies and ensures that all association operations are carried out in accordance with stated goals. As a parent with three adult sons with learning disabilities, Claudette has used her parental experiences as a foundation for her work as member of several federal advisory committees and consults with Provincial and Territorial LDAs on resources, policy and legislation issues in such areas as tax measures for persons with disabilities and improved accessibility for persons with print disabilities in public libraries.

She has been invited as a witness to present a number of briefs to Federal Parliamentary Standing Committees (Finance, Justice, Environment, Health, Disabilities, Post Secondary Education) on issues concerning the impact of federal policy changes and programming on Canadians with learning disabilities. These presentations have been critical in helping the organization successfully inform public policy in a number of priority areas including health, justice, prevention, income support, employment, literacy, research, advocacy, children at risk, and post-secondary education.

This session will be delivered in English. However, the facilitator is bilingual and will be happy to answer any questions in French following the presentation.

SPEAKER / CONFÉRENCIER: Kim Korotkov (EECD)

Response to intervention is a framework that is both prevention and intervention focused. This session will focus on Response to Intervention (RTI) as a model for improving the educational outcomes of all students through monitoring individual progress and using data to inform decisions about instructional needs.

Kim Korotkov is a learning specialist for Education Support Services at the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development. She has over 15 years of experience as a classroom and resource teacher at the middle and high school level. She also taught for 7 years at the University of Guelph as a psychology instructor in learning disabilities. She recently began her PhD in the area of high schools and inclusive education.

This session will be delivered in English.

SPEAKER / CONFÉRENCIÈRE: Anne Comfort (MTA)

This session will discuss the best practices for transitioning students with LD from high school to a university setting. Based on her work at the Meighen Centre and from interviews with graduates, topics covered will include: what to expect your first year at university; what traits are found in “successful “ students with LD; and what to look for in a disability office staff and services.

Anne Comfort, M.Ed., is the Coordinator of the Meighen Centre for Learning Disabilities at Mount Allison University in Sackville, New Brunswick. She has worked in the field of Adult Learning Disabilities for the past 9 years. Formerly a high school and adult educator, Anne has taught and lived in Manitoba, Northwest Territories, Nunavut and New Brunswick. She is currently the Chair of Mt.A.’s Senate Committee on Students with Disabilities as well as the Atlantic Region Representative for the Canadian Association of Disability Service Providers in Postsecondary Education. Her areas of interest include assistive technology and transitioning from high school to post secondary.

This session will be delivered in English. However, the facilitator is bilingual and will be happy to answer any questions in French following the presentation.

SPEAKER / CONFÉRENCIER: Charles Levasseur (NSS)

Comment utiliser des stratégies d’apprentissage pour aider nos étudiants à utiliser d’une manière plus efficace leur technologies d’assistance. Cette session démontrera l’importance de faire le lien entre les technologies et les stratégies d’apprentissage afin d’améliorer les chances de réussite.

Charles Levasseur est le spécialiste en technologie d’assistance pour la Société Neil Squire dans la région de l’atlantique. Il détient une Certification en Technologie d’Assistance de l’université de la Californie situé à Northridge et a complété le programme « Learning DisabilitySpecialist certification LSLD/ATLD (LDED) » offert par le collège Cambrian en Ontario.

This session will be delivered in English. However, the facilitator is bilingual and will be happy to answer any questions in French following the presentation.

SPEAKERS / CONFÉRENCIÈRES: Ann Wagner & Pauline Chouinard

This session will cover everything you need to know about the Canada Student Grant for student with Permanent disability and the Disability Tax Credit.

Ann Wagner MEd., CCC is a Private Transition Counsellor for Clients with Learning Disabilities and ADHD. Along with a busy private practice Ann is a consultant with the NB Learning Disabilities Association, Dept. of Education, NBCC, Literacy Coalition of NB, John Howard Society an d Community Living. She is a guest lecturer and workshop leader for the NB Learning Disabilities Association, NBCC, PETL – Post Secondary Education Training and Labour, the Apprenticeship Programs, CFB Gagetown, NBCAG, Laubach Literacy, Mental Health and various other agencies. She is a passionate advocate and coach for ‘at risk’ clients who struggle with a learning disability and ADHD who need support to succeed in life.

Pauline Chouinard has been employed by Student Financial Services for the past 12 years and has been the professional development coordinator for the past 8 years. She is a member of the federal – provincial Permanent disability working group.

This session will be delivered in English.

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